‘El

Reflecting on a train ride seems a bit silly but can you consider every being that steps foot into a train and their story?

They may get off work late. They might be meeting a friend for a date. They could be wandering without a clue where they’ll end up.

See a train goes and it goes. It doesn’t think about those it takes to and from. You rush down those tile stairs, your shoes pitter pattering, the noises echoing as you make your grand escape. You’ve got your big puffy coat on, expecting late snowfall because the damn rodent saw his shadow again. But that doesn’t matter to the train. It bustles and bustles, the same as it does at 6am on morning rush, the same speed for your 10pm runaway. Just as predicted you’re in a wind tunnel, and that train announces itself very frankly.

whirring louder, louder…just like your heart. The beauty of the subway is that your anxious looks and your heavy breathing, sweaty forehead, and oversized clumsily packed backpack are not as out of the ordinary as you think. You’ll step on that crowded train sandwhiched between people who don’t give two shits about the horrible things you’re escaping, and others who if they know they’d help you in a heart beat. But you can’t tell a soul. It may be a cautionary tale no one wants to hear. Or maybe you don’t want anyone to hear. To judge, of all things you? But you know that’s what happens. You stay quiet that is until later.

But that train, those college kids you were stuffed between and you snuck a seat from, they didn’t need to know. You feel jealous of others on the train, something you’d never expect. They seem to have simple lives. A facade the train creates. No human has a simple life. We are social, inherent beings who have created organized government- nothing is so basic here. And those kids, they were happy and probably headed to drinks that you feel you’ll never be invited to. But you sit with your oversized bag, and you worry with your tote bag. Because this isn’t a trip out, and this isn’t a girl’s sleepover event. It’s a way out.

You heed every warning ever given to you, you don’t break rules but you’d rather be on a sketchy train than at a sketchy home by now. Who takes the subway alone at 10:30 pm that isn’t drunk, sad, or a workaholic? You. You are the one taking the subway to an apartment for safety. That is who you are.

Those padded seats and tinted windows don’t expect weary old you to need them to rest. How could you relax on a train like that? In your circumstances or at all? Admittedly it could be done simply not by yourself and that’s okay. Sleep didn’t come easy that night with the pooling of anxiety in the gut. Escape takes planning and time and you had passively done part, but had to deal with the rest by sunrise.

And just as the sun rose, you are met by the train again. She does not remember why you took her. She sees the same commuters, stuffing her carts until their breath fills the windows with fog. You’ve snuck into a seat discarded by a business man after his stop.

oh how lucky you are to have found it.

luck, is an interesting idea because you seem pretty down on it. You have no plan for your return. Plotting down the time to get yourself moved, but you can’t be sure that you’ll get that right.

Its no matter to the train. Stopping at the exit with it’s terrible stairs that leave you wheezing. Maybe it’s a reminder that you aren’t so innocent in your own need to escape. Maybe it’s inconvenient for everyone too. Your lungs burn in the crisp morning air once you’ve climbed those stairs.

Its time to bid farewell to the station until next time, you pray it’s under better circumstances. You long to take the train for a night out on the town. You wish someone would take you out. Have fun. Let loose.

You hear the train rumble one last time as you walk to “home”. The warmth enemates from steel slatted breaks in the sidewalk. She is on her next destination.

And so are you.

 

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Year 2 brought me

Year 2 brought me 

a lot of what it should

it brought me the tough parts

it brought me the nights we don’t speak of

it brought me cleansing snowfall

and that crisp city air that let me escape

see year 2 brought me a lot of pain

shaking nights

boiling anger

stains of friendships gone awry

year 2 taught me who cares for me

it brought me a twenty minute train ride to a night of solace

in the midst of all that went wrong

but the thing is when it went wrong, year 2 also went right

straightened out the curves in my life

year 2 brought me a family I can not replace

mentors who see the power in me

I wouldn’t trade making magic with them for anything

thank you year two

to the ups and the downs,

the kitten snuggles at the end of the road

for letting me trust my gut

for the light in my dark

and above all

thank you for teaching me even in the dark

An ode to sunflowers

my dearest sunflower,

Oh how you’ve grown. I met you as a seedling, and little did I know you planted your roots in me. They stretched out lovingly like tender arms reaching for a hug. A hug was what you needed. You needed roots to anchor you to the ground as your mind soared. I don’t know what brought you to me. I had accepted that perhaps I was too much for others. Maybe my blossoms were too bright, too loud, and smelled too sweet. But you sunflower, you liked that. I never attracted many bees, and when I found one I wanted, it had already picked another flower. I never found myself stretching out to find others. But then I found you sunflower.

You made my colors turn from white to pink, blushing all the time. It was like a drug, I couldn’t wilt. We were bonded together from our roots. The drought came through and we shrived up together. But like any flower, we just waited. We waited for that storm to come and save us from the drought. When the rain washed away our dust, we found hope again. Finding hope gives us chances to peak out, to grow again. Oh sunflower you grew.

You grew to the point where you let my roots take hold of you once more, and I couldn’t be buzzing with more excitement. You see when a sunflower blooms, it reaches towards the sky. The petals are yellow with ripe sunshine, and you can’t help but stare in wonder at it. It brightens you, just like you did my sunflower.

We grow entwined, we grow sweet as honey, as time passes we don’t wilt anymore because we hold each other up. You are my sunflower, my sunshine and I am so grateful that as long as the sun shines you are mine. You are my sun on a cloudy day. Always here, always smiling. Laughter like a bright, yellow melody. Keep blooming babe.

Let your roots take hold, and grow.

love,

lily of the valley

The sexuality that must not be named

This summer as a young woman who belongs to the lgbtq+ community, I decided that it had finally come time for me to delve into Litchfield Prison and watch Orange is the New Black. Revered for its portrayal of lgbtq+ women, issues of race, and the corrupt nature of the prison system- it really did deliver for me. For any readers who may be new to the series, or unsure what it’s about here’s a brief synopsis I’ve written.

Based on the novel by Piper Kerman of her own experiences in women’s prison, OITNB follows Piper Chapman as she turns herself in to Litchfield prison on drug charges. In her 20s Piper’s ex-girlfriend, Alex Vause, ran a international drug smuggling operation that eventually goes south. The warrant for Piper’s arrest is due to those charges, so she and her fiance, Larry, decide its in her best interest to turn herself in before she’s arrested. Season 1 follows Piper’s life as she adjusts to life inside the prison and soon the story expands to encompass other women and their lives before and currently in the prison.

So let’s talk about the distinct words mentioned in that synopsis I provided you. Did you get that? Piper had an ex-girlfriend and a male fiance.

The question I’ve been asking myself since season 1 (and I’m on season 3 right now) is why does Orange is the New Black treat Piper as if Bisexuality doesn’t exist?

Let’s start with how the show opens. Piper is already in prison but allows the show to back track into how she got there. We move from prison to innercity New York and into the domestic life of Piper and Larry. They’re in love, planning their upcoming wedding, and they are a bit quirky but in a sense that provides more backing to the fact that they love each other. There is never a vibe that Piper feels heterosexually pressured into being with Larry. She’s not trying to please her parents by marrying him. She’s not pretending here. Piper is in love with Larry. End of story. Now once it’s discussed more at length, Piper’s past with Alex is brought up and for highly educated people, Piper’s fiance and her best friend (Polly) are kind of…slightly…homophobic about her past relationship.

When you hear homophobic, most people jump to yelling, screaming, violence- but there is a more subtle form of homophobia at play here. Piper’s old feelings about Alex are invalidated because frankly they can’t believe she ever felt anything for a woman when she’s getting married to a man. They turn up their noses, they treat her like it was a poor mistake in judgement, or that it was just her doing what young people do and it meant nothing. Now once we arrive in prison and it becomes clear over the course of season 1, Alex is in prison with her. We see over a series of flashbacks through all seasons just how intimate Piper’s relationship with Alex was. It clearly defies all of the accusations of her friends and family that ‘it was just a phase’. (the oldest response to bisexuality in the book)

But what’s even more frustrating is hearing the phrase “She used to be lesbian” or “She’s gay now”- OITNB has used all of these phrases and more throughout its time. Understandably for other characters there is a sense of poor education, and a lack of care about correct terms which I get, they just label girls into girls as lesbians. But guys…Piper Chapman is NOT a lesbian.

You’re telling me a woman who tried so hard to keep up her relationship with her fiance while in prison, until ultimately they broke up because of her feelings for Alex returning, and then when she’s on furlough she tries to have sex with and is clearly clinging to the sense of home he instilled in her…is lesbian?

No.

I am a bisexual woman. I fall in love with men. I fall in love with women. Not at the same time. Not all at once.

If Piper were a lesbian she would have an out once in prison, to never have to have sex with Larry ever again. So why does she initiate it when she’s home for furlough? Yes Piper is acting out for attention, but no lesbian wants to have sex with a man. That’s common sense.

I understand sexuality is fluid and can change over time, but this isn’t over time. This is back and forth. I see all of these articles and pages “top ten tv bisexuals” Piper is in but Piper also fits into the sad category of “is bisexual but never says it out loud”.

Read here:

Piper says, I like hot girls and I like hot guys

Piper says, Gay is a spectrum 

Piper is number 44 on the list of Bisexual & Lesbian characters

Even this article mentions that other people are frustrated by the lack of bisexual phrasing in OITNB

I think you get the point.

We have an issue when it comes to bisexuality. No one wants to say it or label it. The characters are either straight or gay pertaining to who they’re in love with. That’s just not true. Bisexuality isn’t gay or straight, or 50/50 half and half. It’s a spectrum. I see a common trope of women starting in love with a man and then falling for a woman and suddenly she was gay. But the relationship with the man was loving, it was mutual, it had actual substance. Just like Piper’s with Larry.

We deserve characters to label themselves as bisexual. We deserve them having coming out stories and being un-apologetically themselves. I want Piper to OWN her sexuality. I want her to make a big fuss and claim a nickname for her sexuality, a phrase, a term. I want it to be something she’s proud of. There’s no need to conflict with her current relationships but as a bisexual viewer, I know she’s bi.

I mentioned before about the education level of other members of the prison and how they may not know the term for bisexual. That’s completely valid but it does not apply to Piper. For a character who spends her time often spouting off random knowledge, who would probably win jeopardy, she’s frankly uneducated about sexuality. OITNB overall treats it like there’s just gay and straight. Which is so much further from the truth.

Then to add onto this I began watching behind the scenes videos, interviews, because well I’m a TV nerd do we really need to ask why? I fell in love with the cast and I love the advocacy of the entire group and they really understand the impact they have on television. It’s beautiful. But there’s a twinge inside of me every time I hear Taylor Schilling asked about lesbian sex scenes, and Piper’s lesbian sexuality. Even the cast is under the guise that Piper is straight up gay. I would have liked some back up in my beliefs of Piper’s sexuality but it’s just not there.

It’s irresponsible to make a show be the standard of progressive and to mark on all of these issues and normalize same sex relationships on tv but to fail when discussions of sexuality comes forward. Representation matters, and we deserve representation. Maybe OITNB has missed the mark, missed the opportunity, to define Piper’s sexuality as bi. But that doesn’t mean they can avoid it completely. Bring in another bisexual character. Making Piper claim her sexuality does nothing to her current relationship. It doesn’t threaten it. It doesn’t invalidate it. It simply means that her previous relationship with Larry was true, and her one with Alex was as well.

It’s also frustrating knowing that OITNB isn’t on network TV, so the writers have less constrictions in terms of being afraid of backlash or having to censor themselves for a timeslot. There’s no reason for the erasure of bisexuality and what it encompasses.

Bisexuality isn’t Voldemort. It isn’t the sexuality who must not be named. It’s real. It’s valid. It’s here. I advise creators to get on board and stop polluting media with tropes and interchanging us with lesbians and straight girls who kissed a girl once at a party. We are here. We deserve characters who will actually say the label, and be unafraid of what lays out for them. It’s all about loving and who we love, and we need to see more love and let other members of LGBTQ+ know that who they love is valid.

Piper could have been one of those great characters that did so.

oh and the purple flowers in her poster art reminds me of the bisexual pride flag which is blue purple and pink respectively.

tea: orange bubble milk tea from Quickly

Push one of epi: A look into medical tv series

Anyone who knows me knows one thing. That I’m self proclaimed “medical show trash”. The interest comes from a love of medical series that my mom, who’s worked at hospitals and medical offices since before I was born, and I watched together. This summer I decided to binge two historic medical tv shows, ER and Saint Elsewhere. Two very different shows, but who’s work I can see reflected in current shows.

St Elsewhere really takes a look into doctors personal lives, and brings a sense of identity to the medical community that I argue didn’t really exist before. Doctors in other shows would be white coats with cold personalities that often just were used to scare the character they were treating. With St. Elsewhere we see a surprisingly diverse cast for a show from 1982, with star studded cast such as Denzel Washington and Christina Pickles. I was also interested in not only was there a female doctor, but they did discuss her over working herself to prove her right to be on staff as a doctor and not a nurse. There was a female Asian medical student, and a student that had traveled abroad that didn’t know English. That’s not to say that show didn’t have a problem with racism or sexism, it did through dialogue and story as unfortunately a lot of shows in the 80s and 90s had.

Speaking of the 90s, in 1994 the medical drama ER premiered and I’ve been binging that as well. ER is such essential viewing if you’re interested in creating a drama, or a medical show because it really set off the idea of emergency medicine and how doctors respond to it. It was one of the longest reigning drama shows on US network television with a record 15 seasons, only rivaled by NBC’s Law&Order with 20 seasons, Law & Order SVU at 19 currently going into the 20th, CSI ended at an equal 15, and the current medical drama Grey’s Anatomy which finished season 13 this year and will be going into 14 in the fall.

ER took the concept of bringing human qualities to those in white coats with a different twist than St. Elsewhere, because what is more dramatic than an Emergency department in downtown Chicago? Location is a very big key reason why this show did so well, shooting in local Chicago areas and developing the industry in the city but also because the amount of trauma they saw seemed relevant to the urban legend of Chicago being such a dangerous city. The cast changes as the seasons grow, and while I have just finished season one I can not speak for the diversity or the topics covered through all 15 years but I can talk about the 26 episodes I have seen. As a viewer you’re thrust into the fray without much explanation of who, what, and where- almost like you’re a medical student alongside doe-eyed John Carter who starts his first surgical ER rotation in the first season.

Notable other series I’ve watched and recommend are: NBC’s The Night Shift, canceled Emily Owens MD (on netflix), Black Box (canceled),  Saving Hope( which is a sort of Canadian Grey’s Anatomy that deals with life between death), Private practice, Code Black, Strong Medicine, Chicago Med, and Rosewood.

I think that medical dramas are such a rich environment that really looks at the human condition in such a unique way. There’s this quality about them that writers should strive for, and that’s what’s so beautiful. The best medical dramas to me are not just the white coat doctors trying to save a life, they’re the ones that show you every person’s flaws. If a doctor believes he’s gods gift by saving lives, the intern who just can’t get their confidence up, the kid who followed the family dream and has yet to find our their passion for the art of medicine- all of these characters that exist alongside us in our own civilization.

What a driving force of Grey’s Anatomy was, is the nostalgic feeling of not knowing what you’re doing as an intern. Things got messy personally, and then the patients reflected the personal challenge in the doctors lives. The key for everything is humanity. To show characters as well rounded individuals.

Some TV doctors you see preforming to their best, being messy but saving the day eventually and you say, I don’t want them to save me- but I argue that one of them probably has and you just didn’t know.

I think that the beauty in TV medical shows is that it’s this secret world, you think just happens there but really it doesn’t. You see what makes the news but you don’t know every story of your local ER. It’s magical to think these situations could exist from interns sleeping with their boss and not knowing, to nurses over dosing, irony of neurosurgeons dying from the lack of head CT, or doctors struggling to not become cold and shells of themselves from working so hard. These are human issues. You can sympathize with these amazing casts.

That is what a medical drama should be. You should feel a pull at your heartstrings from the sheer imagination of real people going through this, but also a wonderment of them pulling off the most heroic day of their lives only to wake up and try to outshine it the next day.

Every day heroes. That’s what they all are at their core, and it’s so beautiful to watch them. Medical dramas teach you about medicine, yourself, and what it takes to be a doctor. I’ve learned so much about who I am from the characters I love, and I’ve learned terms, and how to talk myself through injuries, or situations in my life that parallel the screen. You can always learn from TV, never let anyone tell you that you can’t.

So here’s to the tv doctors, the tv surgeons, to the lives saved at St. Elgis, from Seattle Grace to Grey Sloan Memorial, to Cook County, and the lives lost. Thank you for being there. Thank you for being human.

tea: orange zinger celestial tea

 

 

 

The Anatomy of a Nonprofit

I’ve seen the term a lot recently and have donated myself to nonprofits. So I wanted to discuss the ins and outs of them. Now we all should know what a nonprofit is. However if you don’t here’s a quick summary from The National Counsel of Non Profits

When you think of a “nonprofit” what do you think of? Most likely, you think of a group making a difference in your community. Maybe you are thinking of a large organization, such as Big Brothers Big Sisters or Make-a-Wish, or maybe you think about a local animal shelter or community theatre. These are groups that are tax-exempt under Internal Revenue Code Section 501(c)(3) as “public charities” because they are formed to provide “public benefit.” Community foundations are also part of this group (and so are private foundations, although tax rules treat them a bit differently than public charities.)

Okay so they define it as a public charity whose money goes to benefiting others. This is through millions of different ways but the goal is still the same. That goal is to always donate or use the money in a way that helps others.

But really what is a successful nonprofit, and why should we give to them?

Let’s start and look at where the most number of nonprofits are.

The top three states tend to be

  1. California
  2. Texas
  3. New York

As per the Counsel of Nonprofits. This makes an incredible amount of sense due to each state’s population and resources. The more population you have, the more people you have in need of charity. That charity may be anything from more food banks to feed the poor and homeless, donations to aid medical care/fight for a cure, donations to organizations who fight discriminatory practices and so on.

Nonprofits need a clear goal of donation, the ability to successfully market and engage others in their work. Organization and policy are two other things that are very important for them as well. Everything must be clear and concise.

One part of nonprofits is that many people fear their money is not going to where it should be. When looking for a nonprofit to donate to a good phrase to search for is “100% of all proceeds will benefit_______” or “direct donation” which means your money will go straight to the charity and not be in a separate bank account or in the bank account of a person before given to the charity. Yes, there are known charity scams which I just suggest to research every charity before you make a considerable donation. Make sure the charity you want to donate to does what it says and stands for what you want it to, and that the owners do as well. It can be disheartening to learn after the donation that one of the owners uses the money for something else or doesn’t stand for what you believe in.

Nonprofits truly stand on the ideas of trust and for you to give in and trust the place you are donating to. You must trust that they will use the money for what they’ve said they would.

For more information on myths about Nonprofits I’ll link you to The Counsel of Nonprofit’s page on it.

The top charity in the world is UNICEF which is the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund or just the United Nation’s Children’s Fund.

What Unicef does is help aid children in developing countries so that they gain access to clean water, food, hygiene supplies, and other basic needs. You can donate here!

The second top charity is Human Rights Watch. Human Rights Watch defends human rights across the world. They consist of over 400 staffers from lawyers to defense attorneys, and other scholars of higher academia that fight for human rights. They meet with governments to ensure the changing of polices to benefit people, sue government leaders who endanger their citizens, and much more. They also team with journalists to report on crisis situations where human rights are being denied or are in danger. You can donate to them here.

The site that lists the top charities is https://topnonprofits.com/lists/best-nonprofits-on-the-web/. They’re listing the top charities that get the most traction online, which is where most people learn about charities now. My first true interaction with the charity known as the ACLU or American Civil Liberties Union was through the platform of Twitter.

Earlier this year our president put forward a controversial ‘Muslim Ban’. The ACLU found that this was unconstitutional and challenged it in court. Here’s what the end of that case looked like, from the ACLU’s website itself.

While the text of the Muslim ban “speaks with vague words of national security,” the court recognized that in context it “drips with religious intolerance, animus, and discrimination.” The ban’s message of religious condemnation is contrary to the bedrock constitutional requirement that the government remain neutral among religions: “When the government chooses sides on religious issues, the inevitable result is hatred, disrespect and even contempt towards those who fall on the wrong side of the line.”

The framers of the Constitution recognized how dangerous taking sides would be for our country, and the Fourth Circuit today vindicated this fundamental principle.

One of the members of the court, Judge Wynn, pointed out the historical context. “We have matured from the lessons learned by past experiences documented, for example, in Dred Scott and Korematsu,” he explained, referring to the shameful decisions permitting slavery and Japanese internment. “Laid bare,” Judge Wynn explained, “this Executive Order is no more than what the President promised before and after his election: naked invidious discrimination against Muslims.”

And that is unconstitutional.

The ACLU relies on donations to defend the constitution and the rights of the American people. What began circulating through twitter was a wave of people who did not support the ban, and they would make monthly or large donations to the ACLU so they can keep defending our rights. If you donate 10 dollars you can become a card carrying member of the ACLU which proves you fight for what they believe in which is at its core equal rights for everyone. Donate here.

But of course nonprofits are not always political and now I’ll do a brief list of the charities I’ve donated to and I encourage you to look into and donate at your wish.

  • DSWT– a wildlife fund to protect Elephants and other African wildlife.
  • MFPLA– My Friend’s Place LA is a Los Angeles homeless shelter specifically for the youth of the city. I donated as part of the Tough Mudder Crowdrise challenge hosted by Grey’s Anatomy Actor Giacomo Gianiotti.
  • Rights4Girls– a charity that helps young female victims of sexual assault and human trafficking.
  • Red Nose Day– benefits the poor communities of the United States!
  • ACLU– I’m a card carrying member myself.
  • Jane Goodall Institute– Following the work of Dr. Jane Goodall, the institute works with conversation efforts and helps women in developing countries.
  • NAMI– National Alliance on Mental Health dedicated to protecting those with mental illness, end stigma, and help generate resources.
  • SickKids Foundation– Sick Kids is a Canadian foundation for hospitalized children with illnesses. The money goes to help treatments, find cures, and help the kids!
  • Global Citizen– Global Citizen is a movement that gathers together people to fight for a cause. Their issues are generally human rights issues and they bring together movement that urges governments to vote in favor of human rights. They also host a Global Citizen festival that headlines with Coldplay, artists like Beyonce, U2 and more and donate the proceeds.
  • Dempsey Center– created by Patrick Dempsey to help the battle against cancer each year the Dempsey Center hosts the Dempsey Challenge which is a walk/run, cycle challenge that you must raise 150 dollars for the foundation to participate in. You can donate either directly to the center or as a challenge participant.

Those are just a few off the top of my head that I remember donating to. I’ve donated a lot of money over the years and I don’t always count it because that seems like a waste. The real issue isn’t how much money I have personally donated but how much we can raise all together. Even as little as five dollars can pay for something so meaningful like a vaccination for a child in a developing country. It’s about humanity and doing what’s right for our world. That’s something I really believe in. So the numerical value of my totals don’t mean much to me because it’ll always be growing.

I encourage everyone to seek out a nonprofit close to their heart and to fight for it. It takes a village, and we are each other’s best sources of help. It’s all about coming together to make the world a better place.

 

Aside

Hamilton & Diversity

I had the privilege of going down to San Francisco recently to see the traveling cast of Tony award winning Hamilton. Now if you’re unfamiliar at all with Hamilton, it is a musical based on the life of founding father Alexander Hamilton and what history books generally gloss over.

Lyrical genius Lin Manuel Miranda takes you into each character of Alexander’s narrative with rich songs full of intrigue at a rapid pace that has you on the edge of your seat. The cast does not dare to take a second too long rest between songs, and keeps his world spinning time and time again. Speaking of spinning, the show utilizes a rotating inner stage in which they even reverse for certain songs. It was truly a masterpiece.

But what truly is the forefront of Hamilton is its use of diversity in theatre on such a grand scale. Something that I’ve always admired about TV and television production is the notion of blind casting which was used for the show Grey’s Anatomy specifically, but it meant that actors were not cast for characters with skin color in mind. That was what Lin tried to with Hamilton, and succeeded.

See where as Lin was not only the writer of this show but he played Hamilton in the original New York Broadway run of the show, and Lin himself is of Puerto-Rican descent. Subsequently he makes sure that for each of his shows that a majority of the leads are people of color. This was true of the production I saw in San Francisco, and I honestly would never think to change it.

My Hamilton was played by Michael Luwoye, a young black man. He did phenomenal as far as I am concerned. Something else that really struck me was the character of Angelica Schuyler played by Emmy Raver-Lampman. She had this beautiful hairstyle including a half shaved head, which I think contrasted against the period clothing she wore was very eye catching.

While Hamilton is the story of a white founding father, and very much a story that is something aligned in the ‘american dream’ it is important for us to make the american dream accessible for everyone inside our country so that includes through the media allowing people of other cultures and races to feel at home. Everyone can be Hamilton because of his unnerving want and will to better his world. And if we can step forward and accept others opportunity is just as great as ours, I think the world could be such a greater place.

For more Hamilton content you can buy the soundtrack and mixtape (which is a series of popular musicians covering some of the songs) as well as the novel it was based on, Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow, and watch the PBS documentary on how the show came to be. It is worth the investment to see the show.

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